Lupus confirmed as risk factor for cervical cancer

“Previous evidence that SLE or its treatment might increase the risk of cervical neoplasia has been inconclusive,” , said lead investigator Dr Hjalmar Wadström from the Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm. “Our findings have confirmed that SLE is a risk factor for cervical malignancies, even after adjusting for important risk determinants such as … Continue reading “Lupus confirmed as risk factor for cervical cancer”

“Previous evidence that SLE or its treatment might increase the risk of cervical neoplasia has been inconclusive,” , said lead investigator Dr Hjalmar Wadström from the Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm. “Our findings have confirmed that SLE is a risk factor for cervical malignancies, even after adjusting for important risk determinants such as previous cervical screening.”

SLE is a chronic inflammatory disease that can affect any organ and system, but mainly involves the joints, kidneys and skin. SLE predominately affects women, occurring 10 times more often than in men, and often starting when they are in their 20s and 30s.

Between 2006 and 2012, the rate of cervical dysplasia or invasive cervical cancer among a cohort of women with SLE was twice the rate in a matched general population (adjusted for age, sex, education level, healthcare utilisation, number of children, marital status, family history of cervical cancer, and prior cervical screening). The rate was higher among those women treated with a systemic immunosuppressive drug, compared to those treated with only an antimalarial without additional immunosuppressive treatment.

Results were similar for the risk of cervical dysplasia at different stages of severity, however, this comparison was less significant due to limited numbers of events and follow-up time.

Author: Joe Lovrek

Born in Houston, Raised in Trinity Texas

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