Sloan-Kettering study finds BRAF addiction of thyroid cancers makes them therapeutically vulnerable:

Sloan-Kettering study finds BRAF addiction of thyroid cancers makes them therapeutically vulnerable:   NCI Cancer Center News Papillary carcinoma is the most common form of thyroid cancer. Approximately one quarter of these carcinomas have mutations in the BRAF gene. The prevalence of such mutations is even greater in high-grade carcinomas, particularly those that are refractory … Continue reading “Sloan-Kettering study finds BRAF addiction of thyroid cancers makes them therapeutically vulnerable:”

Sloan-Kettering study finds BRAF addiction of thyroid cancers makes them therapeutically vulnerable:

 

NCI Cancer Center News

Papillary carcinoma is the most common form of thyroid cancer. Approximately one quarter of these carcinomas have mutations in the BRAF gene. The prevalence of such mutations is even greater in high-grade carcinomas, particularly those that are refractory to standard treatment, which is radioactive iodine (RAI). A team of researchers at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, has now identified a way to potentially exploit the expression of BRAF by such cancers for therapeutic purposes.

Click here to read full press release from Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center.

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Among the research institutions NCI funds across the United States, it currently designates 66 as Cancer Centers. Largely based in research universities, these facilities are home to many of the NCI-supported scientists who conduct a wide range of intense, laboratory research into cancer’s origins and development. The Cancer Centers Program also focuses on trans-disciplinary research, including population science and clinical research. The centers’ research results are often at the forefront of studies in the cancer field.

Author: Joe Lovrek

Born in Houston, Raised in Trinity Texas

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