University of Nebraska studies whether additives in hot dogs could affect incidence of colon cancer:

University of Nebraska studies whether additives in hot dogs could affect incidence of colon cancer:   NCI Cancer Center News The addition of ascorbate (vitamin C) or its close relative, erythorbate, and the reduced amount of nitrite added in hot dogs, mandated in 1978, have been accompanied by a steep drop in the death rate … Continue reading “University of Nebraska studies whether additives in hot dogs could affect incidence of colon cancer:”

University of Nebraska studies whether additives in hot dogs could affect incidence of colon cancer:

 

NCI Cancer Center News

The addition of ascorbate (vitamin C) or its close relative, erythorbate, and the reduced amount of nitrite added in hot dogs, mandated in 1978, have been accompanied by a steep drop in the death rate from colon cancer, according to data presented at the 10th AACR International Conference on Frontiers in Cancer Prevention Research, held Oct. 22-25, 2011. However, the incidence rate for colon cancer has apparently not changed much since 1978, according to 2011 data from the SEER Cancer Statistics Review from the National Cancer Institute.

Click here to read full press release from University of Nebraska.

###

NCI cancer centers logoAmong the research institutions NCI funds across the United States, it currently designates 66 as Cancer Centers. Largely based in research universities, these facilities are home to many of the NCI-supported scientists who conduct a wide range of intense, laboratory research into cancer’s origins and development. The Cancer Centers Program also focuses on trans-disciplinary research, including population science and clinical research. The centers’ research results are often at the forefront of studies in the cancer field.

Author: Joe Lovrek

Born in Houston, Raised in Trinity Texas

Leave a Reply