Mayo Clinic study may help physicians determine how patients will respond to immunomodulator therapy for multiple myeloma:

Mayo Clinic study may help physicians determine how patients will respond to immunomodulator therapy for multiple myeloma:   NCI Cancer Center News Research on the same protein that was a primary mediator of the birth defects caused by thalidomide now holds hope in the battle against multiple myeloma, say researchers from the Mayo Clinic in … Continue reading “Mayo Clinic study may help physicians determine how patients will respond to immunomodulator therapy for multiple myeloma:”

Mayo Clinic study may help physicians determine how patients will respond to immunomodulator therapy for multiple myeloma:

 

NCI Cancer Center News

Research on the same protein that was a primary mediator of the birth defects caused by thalidomide now holds hope in the battle against multiple myeloma, say researchers from the Mayo Clinic in Arizona, who presented their results at the 53rd annual meeting of the American Society of Hematology in San Diego… After recent research identified a protein known as cereblon as a primary mediator of the birth defects caused by thalidomide, researchers theorized that cereblon may also orchestrate the anti-tumor properties and be the primary therapeutic target for multiple myeloma.

Click here to read full press release from Mayo Clinic.

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Among the research institutions NCI funds across the United States, it currently designates 66 as Cancer Centers. Largely based in research universities, these facilities are home to many of the NCI-supported scientists who conduct a wide range of intense, laboratory research into cancer’s origins and development. The Cancer Centers Program also focuses on trans-disciplinary research, including population science and clinical research. The centers’ research results are often at the forefront of studies in the cancer field.

Author: Joe Lovrek

Born in Houston, Raised in Trinity Texas

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