Sanford-Burnham study finds molecular switch that allows melanoma to resist therapy

Sanford-Burnham study finds molecular switch that allows melanoma to resist therapy The National Cancer Institute estimates that as many as one in 51 men and women will be diagnosed with melanoma—the deadliest form of skin cancer—at some point during their lifetimes. A Sanford-Burnham research team led is working to unravel the molecular mechanisms underlying the … Continue reading “Sanford-Burnham study finds molecular switch that allows melanoma to resist therapy”

Sanford-Burnham study finds molecular switch that allows melanoma to resist therapy

The National Cancer Institute estimates that as many as one in 51 men and women will be diagnosed with melanoma—the deadliest form of skin cancer—at some point during their lifetimes. A Sanford-Burnham research team led is working to unravel the molecular mechanisms underlying the development and progression of this disease in hopes of improving prevention and treatment strategies. To do this, the team has been studying a protein named Activating Transcription Factor 2 (ATF2), which is associated with poor prognosis in melanoma. ATF2 is a two-faced protein—in melanoma cells, it’s oncogenic, or cancer-causing, while in non-malignant types of skin cancers, it acts as a tumor suppressor.

In a paper published February 3 in the journal Cell, the team identified a molecular switch that controls ATF2’s dual functions. This switch is controlled by protein kinase Cɛ (PKCɛ), which disables ATF2’s tumor-suppressing activities, sensitizing cells to chemotherapy; instead, ATF2’s tumor-promoting activity is enhanced. The team also found that high levels of PKCɛ in melanoma are associated with poor prognosis.

Click here to read full press release.

###

NCI cancer centers logoAmong the research institutions NCI funds across the United States, it currently designates 66 as Cancer Centers. Largely based in research universities, these facilities are home to many of the NCI-supported scientists who conduct a wide range of intense, laboratory research into cancer’s origins and development. The Cancer Centers Program also focuses on trans-disciplinary research, including population science and clinical research. The centers’ research results are often at the forefront of studies in the cancer field.

Author: Joe Lovrek

Born in Houston, Raised in Trinity Texas

Leave a Reply